Dark room photography enlightens budding artist

Exploring a family legacy through the lens of a treasured hand-me-down Pentax K1000

ctraineditsThe room must be completely dark with no visible light. The nearest bathroom will do. I shut off all the lights and run my fingers along the frame of the camera, searching for the round knob on top of the device. I curl my fingertips around its edge and pull up.

The camera jolts in my hand as the back casing bursts open. Fumbling in the dark, my fingers search for the film casing sitting on the countertop. Once found, I place the roll of film protected within the case inside the small nook within the camera. I push the rewind knob back down, locking the film in place, creating a snug fit. The process is very meticulous, and any error, no matter how small, could ruin the film. This is a fact I know far too well, given the amount of trial and error I have explored over the years.

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Welcoming newcomers to Calgary

After crossing continents in search of asylum, immigrants and refugees settle into their new lives with the support of workers who have taken a similar path

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Refugees from countries such as Somalia, Sudan, Iraq and, notably, Syria, are finding sanctuary in Canada’s cities after being forced to flee their homelands in search of safety.

The Canadian government estimates that there are 19.5 million refugees around the world. In 2015, our country helped 13,600 people find asylum. This year, Canada is anticipating resettling another 25,000 Syrian refugees alone.

But what does that look like on the ground?

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Losing celebrities: When stars like Alan Rickman and David Bowie die, why do we care so much?

Film and culture critic Mario Trono makes sense of our strong reactions to celebrity deaths

RickmanBowie copyLike many, I have rolled my eyes at the phrase “spontaneous outpouring of grief” when it came to the death of a celebrity.

Grief is what you feel when a close friend or beloved family member passes and your particular corner of the space-time continuum transforms into a wind-swept desert you must cross. It’s when no moment of the day is safe from that feeling of sickening, painful awareness washing over you again and again. You feel like Milton’s Satan —hell is wherever you are. At least until you grieve properly in the fullness of time and get closure. But closure of that kind is a hard bought thing, slow in coming, limited in its consolations.

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What would Marshall McLuhan say about screen culture?

How today’s modern advances might be seen through the eyes of Canada’s most famous media theorist

McLuhanthumbThis is the year of augmented reality. In 2016, manufacturers, beginning with Microsoft, will offer products that will allow us to see virtual objects as if they were part of the material world. The uses of augmented reality for consumers are likely to include videogames and enhanced movies. But augmented reality will also allow businesses to test and adapt new products before final production. Imagine putting on a headset and viewing a new electric car from different angles and even starting it up for a virtual test drive — all before the car is manufactured.

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