Feature City Hall Stories

Age before modern beauty: Calgary’s heritage buildings benefit the city, says president of Heritage Property Corporation

A lack of heritage preservation is becoming a growing concern for Calgarians

ThumbSnowdonBuildingFor a long time, the C.C. Snowdon building looked like any other building on 11th street SE. Named after businessman Campbell Camillus Snowdon, it was built between 1911-1914, used as a refinery and featured large windows and three massive safes built into the walls.

Over the years, it was painted white, and the warehouse suffered extensive damage from a fire that occurred in the 1980's. Although tenants still used the office space, the building clearly had seen better days.

Luckily, Heritage Property Corporation saw potential in restoring the historical building. They have taken the white paint off of the brick, rebuilt the old warehouse and are adding in other features to fuse in the old with the new. By maintaining the character of the structure, Heritage Property Corporation has found a way to maintain a piece of Calgary's history.

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City takes steps forward to legalize secondary suites

Calgary Planning Commission approves secondary suite bylaw amendments to move before City Council in May

THUMBMACKAYThe Calgary Planning Commission approved amendments March 26 to the Land Use Bylaw that would allow secondary suites in Wards 7, 8, 9, and 11 and streamline the application process for suites in the city.

A total of 35,395 homes exist in these four wards that could potentially become eligible for secondary suites.

The commission's preliminary approval of the bylaw amendments means they will go forward to a city council public hearing in May before a final decision is made. Lesley Kalmakoff, a city planner, says the amendments are aimed at improving the secondary suite process.

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Secondary suites: More than just paperwork and fix-ups

A behind-the-scenes look at the people raising the bar for these accessory residences

suites-thumbA cursory glance at the single-family house didn't offer any clues as to what was inside. It looked no different from any other of the bungalows lining the northwest Calgary suburban cul-de-sac. But in this case a new fully legal secondary suite lay somewhere within.

Shawn Langille, a realtor and leasing associate at Redline Real Estate Group, opened a tall wooden gate leading to the back of the house. The 'backyard' had been transformed into its own area. Large windows framed the 'front' door to the house. Inside, sunlight spilled into an intimate, airy space that didn't feel like a basement suite.

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Was passing Bill-C36 a mistake?

The altering of sex industry laws with Bill C-36 gets mixed reviews

poster-sex-work-4---thumbnailAfter the Supreme Court struck down existing prostitution laws last December 2013, those laws were adjusted and presented in the form of Bill C-36.

Government documents explain that this Bill still allows the selling of sex, but in a much narrower scope, and makes buying it a criminal offense.

It is completely illegal to purchase sex anywhere at anytime, and those who do so are going to face greater penalties.

Bill C-36 was passed Oct. 6, receiving royal assent on Nov. 6 and then going into effect Dec. 6.

The focus is said to be solely on the consumer. However controversy is arising because some are wondering: won't more harshly criminalizing the consumer also indirectly affect the individual offering their services?

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