Throne of Vengeance continue to establish themselves as one of Calgary’s most dedicated local groups

To many, Throne of Vengeance might be a familiar name. The group is very involved in Calgary’s music scene, headlined the Calgary Metalfest, Boonstock and main stages at countless venues throughout the city.

The band have also been crowned Calgary’s best rock band in 2011 and again in 2013 by the Calgary Beer Core — an organization that has been promoting alternative music in Calgary for over 10 years.

Throne of Vengeance have established themselves as a high energy four piece act that strives to create a fusion of the traditional metal sound and modern groove.

 Forming out of the remnants of Tommy Holt and Trevor Cobb’s former band, Throne of Vengeance eventually assimilated Trevor’s brother Riley Cobb as their bassist and, after passing up a few other candidates, signed on Brady Side as their lead guitarist.

Though talented musicians in their own right, they have gained much of their recognition through dedication to the Calgary music scene and their work with legendary album producer, Paul Sabu.

Riley Cobb (left) and Tommy Holt (right) on stage at the Palomino. Each member of the band contributes something to both their sound and their stage presence.

Photo by Jodi BrakSabu — who has worked alongside the likes of David Bowie and Alice Cooper —continues to work with Throne of Vengeance and front man Tommy Holt says Sabu’s experience is a real asset to the band.

“He really helped with the overall flow of our albums,” Holt said. “He helped us make every track sort of melt into the next one.”

Sabu came into contact with the band through the sheer luck and a mutual friend. While his finishing touches can only compliment what the band brings to the table, but with Throne of Vengeance, Sabu has plenty of talent to work with.

“I love these guys and I have been fortunate enough to have worked on their last two CDs,” Sabu said in an email to the Calgary Journal.

“Throne of Vengeance is pure synergy in action… If anyone was to look up the definition of a band, it wouldn’t surprise me if Throne of Vengeance is used as a definitive reference.”

Being recognized and rewarded by the local community has been extremely motivating for the band. Brady Side, lead guitarist of Throne of Vengeance, said it has pushed them to be much more active in their own back yard.

“The local scene is one of the big driving forces behind the band,” Side said. “We take part in as much of the scene as possible and we’ve started challenging other bands to do the same.”

Brett Whittingham is the drummer for Chron Goblin — another local band which often shares the stage with Throne of Vengeance — and describes the band as ambassadors of the local music scene.

Brady Side, guitarist for Throne of Vengeance, joins in the chorus of their new song ‘Assassin of Youth’.

Photo by Jodi BrakIn fact, most of the group is involved with other musical projects while still maintaining a dedication to Throne of Vengeance. Bassits Riley Cobb plays in a local Alice in Chains tribute band and guitarist Brady Side is a member of the Paige Woodbury Band.

They can each stand apart, but together they have created something that has caught the attention of fans and fellow musicians alike.

Alessandra Priolo — a dedicated Vengeance fan who was taking photos at their Oct. 29 performance at the Palomino — said that it is the band’s high energy shows that keeps fans coming back to see the group.

“What keeps me coming back to see their shows is the high energy drumming, killer guitar riffs and unique vocal style,” Priolo said over Facebook. “They are a great bunch of talented guys (who are) heavily involved in the music scene and a pleasure to watch each and every time.”

Riding on the waves of their recent Calgary Beer Core award, Throne of Vengeance has made big plans for the future including a cross-Canada tour and the promises of a new album.

Drummer Trevor Cobb says that the songs for their new album are shaping up to be a change of sound for the group.

“We’re trying something new with this one — it’s more refined, but at the same time really thrashy,” Cobb said. “It’s going to be more like, anthemic thrash punk than traditional heavy metal.”

jbrak@cjournal.ca