The Museum of Fear and Wonder, located in Bergen, Alta., is the creation of brothers Brendan and Jude Griebel. The items on display are described by the brothers as being “emotionally uneasy,” and their website states the museum aims to highlight the psychological and narrative qualities of objects. Check out the photo gallery and see how it makes you feel. 

Anatomical Annie, the most mass-produced CPR dummy. The face was modeled after an unidentified woman who drowned in France. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

A chess set carved by a prisoner on death row in Louisiana, 1970.  Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Papier-mâché bust originally from the old Trinity Grace Church in New York’s East Village. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

An early 20th century taxidermied rocking horse made from a stillborn foal. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

A Tibetan Kapala engraved skullcap on display. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Life-sized leather doll made in the 1920’s from an estate in Texas (left) stands beside another doll. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

A 1930’s handmade dollhouse crafted in the Appalachian region of the U.S. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

A death mask of an unknown male, made in Holland in 1870. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Vintage doll heads, a 1940’s Roly Poly Clown, a garden gnome and more are on display at the museum. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Architectural house models on display. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Ouiji boards line the entrance into the museum. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

Anatomical eye model, created by Somso, Germany. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.

 The museum has a number of antique motorized bodies, or automatons on display, including this pedaling automaton doll. Photo by Kate Mackenzie.